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Monthly Archives: February 2012

Job Creation on Track to Sustain Economic Growth

The week after the release of the monthly employment report is typically quiet for economic data and events in the United States, and this week (February 6 – 10) is no exception. There are few, if any, potentially market-moving economic events in the United States this week, and with the fourth quarter corporate earnings season winding down, market participants are likely to be focused on monetary and fiscal policy at home and abroad, along with Chinese economic data for January…

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Job Creation on Track to Sustain Economic Growth

Questions and Answers About S&P’s European Downgrades

Because the recent European Union (EU) ratings cuts by Standard & Poor’s were generally anticipated by investors, and were in most cases not as large as feared, the market reaction was relatively muted…

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Questions and Answers About S&P’s European Downgrades

January May Seem “Super,” but Don’t Be Bowled Over

Last week, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) hit a new three-and-a-half-year intraday high [Chart 1]. Earnings, gross domestic product (GDP), and consumer spending are already back to new highs, so seeing the stock market return to pre-financial crisis levels seems reasonable…

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January May Seem “Super,” but Don’t Be Bowled Over

Unintended Consequences of Low Rates

As is typical in the first week of a new month, this week (January 30 – February 3) is packed with key economic releases in the United States. Employment, manufacturing, consumer spending and consumer confidence will compete with another flare-up of the European fiscal woes and key manufacturing data in China…

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Unintended Consequences of Low Rates