Profit margins may continue to defy the skeptics and remain elevated. The  primary drivers of robust corporate profit margins remain largely intact, including limited wage pressure, corporate efficiency, and low input costs, and support our view that earnings growth may be poised to accelerate through year-end and into 2016. Despite a lack of revenue growth, the operating margin for the S&P 500 remains near multi-decade highs; we expect corporate America to continue to defy the skeptics and potentially generate strong profit margins over the next several quarters and likely beyond.

The S&P 500’s operating margin remains near multi-decade highs despite several challenges. The business cycle is now more than six years old, a bit on the long side relative to history, which has led some to predict profit margin contraction. The economy has produced several years of steady job growth and the unemployment rate (5.1% in September 2015) is low, which would normally bring some upward pressure on wages and hurt margins. To an extent, margins are mean reverting, so they tend to head back to their long-term average after periods of strength such as we have experienced. Interest rates have bottomed, perhaps suggesting that borrowing costs may be poised to move higher. Yet, despite all of these reasonable arguments for margins to contract, the S&P 500’s operating margin remains near multi-decade highs. We see little reason to expect much, if any, margin contraction for at least the next several quarters. We expect strong profitability to support earnings growth acceleration in  late 2015 and early 2016 and provide a favorable backdrop for the stock market. The primary drivers of robust corporate profit margins remain largely intact, supporting our view that earnings growth may be poised to accelerate through year-end and into 2016.

How long will profit margins continue to deft the skeptics?